Working mum v’s working women – is there really a battle in the workplace?

 

Red magazine have interviewed more than 5000 women to find out if there is a “battle” in the workplace of mums v’s non-mums? The results are really interesting with just 4% of working mums thinking their colleagues disapproved when they had to leave the office in exceptional circumstances, but 41% of non-parents said it was unfair as they are left to pick up the pieces. 40% of non-parents claim they work harder than colleagues with children.

 

But do working mums have it easier? Well the report also shows that 78% of non-parents have seen their stressed colleagues in action and admitted being a working parent essentially means having two full-time jobs. Many working mums spent a fifth of their household income on childcare and 64% have less than half of their salary left after paying the bills, with 34% of mothers paying for childcare entirely out of their own salaries.

 

We were shocked by the statistics and the thought that women are battling against each other in the workplace, so we ask:

 

Do you agree working women who are not mums work harder than mums?

Do you feel annoyance in your work place that mums are given special treatment?

What would you like to see changed if anything to create a more even playing field in the workplace?
Mojomums say:

 

Do you agree working women who are not mums work harder than mums?

 

I guess it can depend on the individual, however here at Mojomums we are all working mums and we all work really hard to ensure we get the job done. In fact the part time mums often work harder than they used to in full time jobs as they have to deliver and have less hours to do it in, so when they are in the office they are really productive. We have found that recruiting mums has been such a benefit as staff are loyal and respect the fact that there is flexibility in their working arrangement so often volunteer to do more than is expected.

 

Do you feel annoyance in your work place that mums are given special treatment?

 

It depends on the situation and employer, again at Mojomums we are very flexible when it comes to school events etc, as this is the nature of our business however Sally (our founder and owner) also runs another very successful business where the employees are male, female, mums and non-mums and there is still plenty of flexibility for special events, family situations, etc you even get a day off for your birthday on top of your holiday allowance! I think employers can feel pressured into giving time off for parent events as it is expected and therefore begrudgingly do it, so when those without children ask for the same they are often denied. However there should be flexibility in the workplace for all members of staff, after all if the workforce are empowered and happy, they will be more productive. If you give you very often receive back!

 

What would you like to see changed if anything to create a more even playing field in the workplace?

 

More flexibility, more roles for experienced, skilled mums and dads to return to work but with opportunities for part time working or job share to give parents the opportunity to return to their profession rather than just a job. This also gives businesses the opportunity to employee often very senior skilled workers but not having to pay a full time salary meaning they can often get more different skills and experience for their business. If every business understood how much they can get from empowering their staff and offering flexibility I don’t think they would ever look back!

 

We’d love to hear your opinion on this and also how it is for you in your place of work, is your employer understanding or are you worried that getting pregnant could actually mean the end of your career? Whatever your situation tell us below:

One Response to Working mum v’s working women – is there really a battle in the workplace?

  1. Clare says:

    I think most of the pressure comes from mums themselves. I am a working mum and hate to feel any type of compromise because I need to leave work unexpectedly due for child-related matters, whether its illness or childcare challenges. How often have I encountered a male colleague have to leave for the same reason? Errmmm … never?! As a result, I tend to over-compensate and will work longer hours ‘just in case’. I work in a male-dominated environment but feel little pressure or scrutiny from my colleagues because I have a family which has to come first. So maybe it is women – with or without children – are we our harshest critics?

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